Category Archives: SkyScape

Not the commonplace day

Waking up early in the a.m always reveals the day ahead to be one full of discoveries rather than what if’s and missed opportunities.
It’s not too often that you see a hummingbird, let alone a young one that isn’t fully mature. You always make use of what you have, as sometimes you choose to just travel with one lens.

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Baby Hummingbird

Luckily, it also happens to be a rather reliable lens for capturing almost anything except a stunning landscape at a moment’s notice – the 50mm f/ 1.8.
Then as you meditate (I’ll just assume you know what I mean here) during your day on the things that matter greatly, you start to get the signs regardless of indirect or its opposite.

fibonacci shell
Fibonacci shell

As always though, appreciate what is given to you and also what you don’t have.
Have you seen any interesting sightings recently when you look into the cosmos? I’ll give you a peep of what I saw; due to only having one lens though I wasn’t able to get the entire scene, but I believe with the coming of this super blood moon coming tomorrow that there will be a lot of seen and unseen happenings out there.

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Streaks of glory
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Fantail moon

Keep your EYE open, trust me.

Starry Night

So a random trip to an empty area is St. James where there are no interruptions, little sky pollution and absolute quiet produced these…

Milky way Square Format
Milky way Square Format

This one below was a bit challenging as I thought the range of my built in wireless flash would reach the range to fire off my 430ex II from that distance. What a misconception I had. So I had my friend did this instead with my 10 sec open shutter.

Milky Way Lanscape Fun
Milky Way Landscape Fun

And pushing the 60D for the first time to ISO 3200 still gave me satisfying results in capturing this section of the milky way sky at 18mm w/ the Canon 18-55mm IS ( First version ). Not bad for a lousy kit lens and a 5 year old camera body technologically speaking.

Milky Way Sky
Milky Way Sky

Celestial Event : Blood Moon – April 15, 2014

Blood Moon is sometimes used to describe a Total Lunar Eclipse. When the Earth casts its shadow on a Full Moon and eclipses it, the Moon may get a red glow.

Lunar Tetrad

Total lunar eclipses are rare – only about one in three lunar eclipses are total. About four to five total eclipses can be seen at any place on Earth in a decade.

Lunar eclipses usually do not occur in any specific order. However, every once in a while, four total lunar eclipses happen in a row. This is called a lunar tetrad. The total lunar eclipses happen 6 months apart. There are at least six full Moons between two total lunar eclipses in a tetrad.

(Excerpt from http://www.timeanddate.com/eclipse/blood-moon.html)

Hmm, so a rare celestial event, that most of us probably have never seen in our lifetimes; happening at a time where I have full opportunity to witness such an event but also capture it.

This eclipse is the first in the series of the lunar tetrad, which occurred on April 15th, 2014 and started at 00:53 and ended at 6:37, although by that time it was already below the horizon so for those of us in Barbados it really “ended” around 5:33 (according to http://www.timeanddate.com). It indeed was roughly around that time when I started and finished shooting; sitting down on a concrete block for hours with a cup of coffee on the ground just shooting away and adjusting my camera in manual mode and the tripod every hour or so. After hours of post processing (this time last year when I did the actual processing I was working on an old Dell Studio laptop circa 2009) and it was about to croak from the loading and compositing of those files. After more than 3 painful hours of merging, processing and compositing I believe I had my masterpiece.

Any of you recognize the pattern/geometry used in this composite? 🙂

IMG_0377 entire eclipse

And here’s an extra that I found with one of the planets being highly visible that morning to the far right shown below. This was a 6 sec exposure with taken at ISO 1600, f/5.6 at 70mm.
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